Cadastral plan

The cadastral plan is an individual map from the cadastral map series, in which the parcels are entered with the boundaries, parcel numbers and possibly types of use.1

It is kept in the property registry. This is a state surveying and registration institution. In the cadastre the entire surface of the national territory is divided and described by districts, corridors and parcels. Certain sub-districts consisting of various corridors can be described as a district. Corridors in turn consist of parcels, which is the smallest independent unit in the property registry.
The property registry consists of the property map and the property book. The property book – the descriptive part of the cadastre – states the factual and geometric data for each parcel. The property map consists of the individual cadastral plans with the respective parcels. By specifying parcel numbers, each parcel is clearly demarcated and defined in the cadastral plan.2 The structure of the property registry can be presented as follows:



Figure: Liegenschaftskataster
Source: Own research based on Jenn, Matthias (2009). Öffentliches Baurecht. In: Balensiefen, Gotthold; Bönker, Christian; Geiger, Norbert; Schaller, Wolfgang: Rechtshandbuch für die Immobilienpraxis. Erwerb, Entwicklung, Bestandshaltung, Vermarktung, München, S. 138.

The cadastral map also shows the boundary marks, district and corridor boundaries, location names and often also the plans of buildings. Topographic objects are also sometimes shown. Thus, cadastral plans – with a few exceptions – are a technical survey of the local property portfolio.3

The cadastral plan was originally an island map. It primarily showed paths, waterway boundaries, field boundaries and parcel boundaries. All parcels on a map were an “island” on the map surface.

Today cadastral plans are usually framework maps. Only rarely are they still shown as island cards (e.g. in rural areas). Any number of maps can be added together in a framework map.
A further development of the cadastral plan is the Automated Property Registry.4 This contains the maps in digital form. The benefit of this for users is that all maps can be viewed at different scales.5 Furthermore, the maps do not have to be requested through the respective offices, which ensures faster availability.
  • 1 Vgl. Schaar, Hans-Wolfgang (2007): Flurkarte. In: Sandner, Siegfried; Weber, Ulrich (2007): Lexikon der Immobilienwertermittlung, 2. Aufl. Köln, S. 278.
  • 2 Vgl. Bönker, Christian; Lailach, Martin (2009): Praxisleitfaden Immobilienrecht. Erwerb Finanzierung Bebauung und Nutzung, 2. Aufl. München, S. 43-44.
  • 3 Vgl. Schaar, Hans-Wolfgang (2007): Flurkarte. In: Sandner, Siegfried; Weber, Ulrich (2007): Lexikon der Immobilienwertermittlung, 2. Aufl. Köln, S. 278.
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: 18.09.2019